Resources for ResLife and Student Leaders

Posts Tagged ‘Valparaiso University’

Door Dec: Shield

In Door Decs on February 13, 2014 at 12:55 PM

Shield Door Dec
(Gabe)

Materials:

Instructions:

Cut the large shield out of colored paper and the smaller shields out of white paper. Glue them together and add your resident’s names!

Credit: Gabe, Valparaiso University

Door Dec: Simple Crown

In Door Decs on February 13, 2014 at 12:44 PM

Crown Door Dec
(Dia, Valparaiso University)

Materials:

  •  Colored paper (card stock, printer paper, or construction paper will all work)
  • Glitter Glue
  • Markers
  • Scissors
  • PTHB Simple Crown Template

Instructions:

Cut out the crowns from your colored paper, attach a simple color block for the name, and decorate with markers and glitter glue!

Hints & Variations:

  •  You can easily free hand the crown or choose a more complicated pattern.

Credit: Dia, Valparaiso University

Bulletin Board – Nikola Tesla

In Bulletin Boards on April 14, 2013 at 2:12 PM

101_3307

Supplies:

  • Template (BAM)
  • Butcher block paper (I used black)
  • Scissors and staplers and everything you normally use for bulletin boards
  • Push-pins
  • String/ribbon

Instructions:

Print off that pretty template with everything you’ll need.  Now, as in the example, space Tesla’s inventions and their related blurbs around the main ‘Tesla.’  Use the string or ribbon, in conjunction with push-pins, to connect each invention to ‘Tesla.’  Additional information and the blurbs about the three-parts awesome can adorn elsewhere on the board.  I’m using the quotes as hall-decor up and down the corridor.

And if anyone’s interested, the font used throughout is simply “Tesla.”

Credit: Mike Siano, Valparaiso University

Door Dec: Sci-Fi Spaceships

In Door Decs on March 17, 2013 at 10:28 PM

spacetags

Supplies:

  • Black cardstock
  • Space and ship bases (example)
  • Functional printer
  • Scissors
  • Rubber cement
  • Tape

 Instructions:

 Compile what ships and space backdrops you desire and print them out accordingly.  Cut the ships out as close to their edges as you can, and the space backdrops in whatever design you choose.  Cement the space backdrops to cardstock, following up with the spaceships.

Next, print off nametags (black background, if possible; I snipped a black-background document with the colored names names into a separate Doc to print, otherwise the black background doesn’t carry) and paste onto decs with tape; this allows for reworking, if need be.  Repeat as needed!

Credit: Mike Siano, Valparaiso University

SPPAAAAAAACCE!

Door Dec: Marvel Emblems

In Door Decs on March 17, 2013 at 10:14 PM

marvel tags

Supplies:

  •  Assorted colored paper (construction or regular)
    –  Black & bright blue for S.H.I.E.L.D.
    –  Red & gold for Iron Man
    –  Green & purple for Hulk
    –  Gray & red for Thor
    –  Red & black for Deadpool
    –  Gold & red for X-Men
    –  Blue & red for Captain America
    –  Red & blue for Spider-Man
  • Logo template (See here)
  • Crayons/Colored Pencils
  • Rubber Cements
  • Functional printer
  • Scissors

 Instructions:

 First, use the logo template (or find/make others, if you so desire) and print off one logo for each resident.  Color them in accordingly and cut them out.  Rubber cement them to the first backing-paper, set aside.

Type up nametags for each resident, paying attention to the logos and fonts you have to work with.  Print those, cut those out, and rubber cement those onto the same backing-paper as their respective logos.

Finally, rubber cement the logo and its respective nametag onto the final sheet, where they will hang proudly forever.

Credit: Mike Siano, Valparaiso University

Bulletin Board: S.H.I.E.L.D. Files

In Bulletin Boards on March 12, 2013 at 7:31 PM
101_3134

S.H.I.E.L.D. Files

Supplies:

  • Black butcher block paper
  • File folders
  • Functional Printer
  • Research
  • Tape
  • Stapler

Instructions:

Before starting anything, you’ll need the information.  I’ve looked at the DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and crossed disorders inside with heroes I could think of; some, it might be a stretch to diagnose, and the disorders themselves might not be documented on the character-file.  If you can find evidence in characters’ behaviors, though, that’s all you need to back it up.

So, research a disorder that a hero/ine exhibits and try to tie their history as a character with actual scientific backing, making a one-two of splicing educational value into popular characters.  Everyone is free to use my example, add to it, or take away from it as they see fit.  Print out the information and the pictures you need.

Once you have that figured out, design the file folders with the SHIELD emblem for fanciness; I had a friend stencil out a design for me.  Staple together sheets that talk about the same disorder and, with the tape, figure out where you can put everything on your board.  Once you have the layout figured out, staple everything to the bulletin board.

Hints:

  • Be open and creative when trying to ‘diagnose’ heroes; talk to other friends you might have, see what they think about the heroes.  They don’t need to diagnose them themselves, but they can help set you on a path.
  • Try to tie this into an invisible illness theme, if you can, and maybe add the idea that those suffering from such a disorder can still do great things; it definitely can’t hurt to be noted.
  • You can definitely do this with other popular culture areas, too, with any combination of educational/entertainment value: Disney characters, major video game characters, Batman, and many, many more!

Credit: Mike Siano, Valparaiso University

Door Dec: Secret Files

In Door Decs on March 6, 2013 at 7:44 PM
Secret Files (Mike Siano)

Secret Files (Mike Siano)

While these are for a Nikola Tesla theme, they can be used for Area 51, urban legends, detective files, and so on!  Be creative and adapt!

Supplies:

  • Yellow (for file folders) and white (for secret files) computer paper
  • Folder template
  • Relevant font (font ‘Tesla’ used in example)
  • ‘Secret files’ (Tesla example)
  • Functional printer
  • Cardstock (for backing)
  • Rubber cement
  • Tape

Instructions:

 Paste copies of the folder template into a Word doc and insert text boxes in each one; type in residents’ names with your awesome font.  Make sure that, when folded, the name is right-side up.  Print this on the yellow paper.  Next, print your ‘secret files’ on plain white paper; have one file for each resident.  Cut the folders and the files.

Tape the secret files into the folder so they poke out some; use this as a bearing to see what looks good.  Once satisfied, rubber cement the back of the folder and the sticking-out file to cardstock; this keeps the dec sturdy.  With this, you can either leave the front part of the folder open so that folk can open it or seal it shut with tape or rubber cement; your call.  Repeat as needed.

Credit: Mike Siano, Valparaiso University

Door Dec: Movie Reel

In Door Decs on March 6, 2013 at 7:22 PM
Movie Reel (Mike Siano)

Movie Reel (Mike Siano)

Simple to make, pretty to look at, and easy to fit into any theme that goes with movies!

Supplies:

  • Black cardstock
  • White crayons/colored pencils
  • Scissors
  • Functional printer
  • Film ‘reel’ samples (Pixar Shorts example with font suggestion at end)
  • Rubber cement

Instructions:

Start by finding film reels to use; if you can’t find them by image search engine, use the Snipping Tool in your computer’s Accessories folder and snip parts from Youtube.  Paste each one, about the same size, into a single word document and resize them to about 4 inches across (see example).

Assuming each dec gets three film strips, print however many copies are needed.  Cut each movie frame out and rubber cement three alike frames to black cardstock.  Leaving room on either side, cut around the frames.  Now, fill in the area on either side with white film-catchers.

Lastly, print off residents’ names with a nice, relevant font (Charlemagne Bold used in example, being the Pixar logo’s font) and attach with adhesive.

Hints:

  • You will be cutting a lot of things.  Invest in comfortable scissors or a hand masseuse beforehand.

Credit: Mike Siano, Valparaiso University

Bulletin Board: Changing Seasons

In Bulletin Boards on March 1, 2013 at 1:44 AM
Changing Seasons(Samantha Cassell)

Changing Seasons
(Samantha Cassell)

Overview: This board is a tree that changes with the seasons! It’s great for a large board that doesn’t need to change often and can be worked on over the course of a whole year.

Supplies:

Colored Paper: green, red, orange, yellow, blue, white

Large green and brown paper

Scissors

Staples

Instructions:

For Summer/Spring:

Start by cutting out a big tree on a large sheet of brown paper. Make it a shape that will look good both covered in leaves or bare. Hang up the tree with some green grass for it to sit on. A blue background would look wonderful (we were out).

Cut out a ton of leaves. Two different colored greens look good. Fill up the tree!

For Fall:

Orange, red, and yellow leaves now. Put a few of them on the grass so it looks like the leaves are falling. You can get away with cutting fewer of them, so the tree looks a little bare.

So colorful

So colorful

For Winter:

Cover it all in white. The grass needs to be covered, there can be icicles hanging off the tree. Small scraps of white paper look like snowfall, or you can make fancy snowflakes if you feel like it!

My girls got to it before I did

My girls got to it before I did

Tree- Snow

The official version!

Hints:

  • Make the leaves simple. You’ll be cutting out a lot of them, so a simple pointed oval shape is a good idea.
  • You can cut out leaves in your free time so that when you need more/different ones, you’ll already have a bunch!
  • Keep the leaves! If you only staple them once, you can reuse them when Spring rolls around again.

Credit: Samantha Cassell, Valparaiso University

Educational Program: Ties that Bind

In Educational Progams, In-Services on March 1, 2013 at 1:25 AM
Ties that Bind(Samantha Cassell)

Ties that Bind
(Samantha Cassell)

Overview:

This program is meant to highlight the diversity within a community, especially “invisible” diversity. Different colored strips of paper represent different aspects of someone’s identity. Residents write on the strips why that identity is important to them, then the strips are added to a large link chain. The chain can be hung up in a common area. Diversity, decoration, fun!

Supplies:

Lots of colored paper

Scissors

Stapler

Pens

Instructions:

Cut out a lot of strips of different colored papers. I suggest about 8 different colors. Choose an aspect of identity/personality to correspond to each color. Ours were gender, race, religion, family, ability, activity, sexual identity, region, other.

Colors of diversity

Colors of diversity

Have residents choose a few that are important to them- as many as they want, depending on how inspired they are. They should write down why it is important to them or how they feel it plays into their identity. Once they wrote it down, staple the strip into the chain! Hang the chain up in a common area for all to see.

The mostly-completed chain

The mostly-completed chain

This is a good way to demonstrate all types of diversity. It shows both how the community is similar as a whole but each person is a unique individual as well. Yay, diversity!

Hints:

  • We did this program in the lobby. Since it didn’t take much time, almost everyone who came into the building participated! Those who were really into it stayed longer and did more in-depth links.
  • Tailor the categories to your community.

Credit: Samantha Cassell, Valparaiso University